About the TWS

The Thomas Wolfe Society (TWS) was established in 1979 to promote appreciation and study of the works of this famous American author. Members meet annually in May at locations in the U.S. or Europe visited by Wolfe or familiar to him. Recent conferences have been held in Charlotte, NC; Indianapolis, IN; Savannah, GA; Greenville, SC; and Paris, France.

Undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in colleges and universities worldwide may apply for a Thomas Wolfe Travel Grant in Honor of Richard S. Kennedy, which carries a cash award of $300. Contact: troberts@paideia.org

The Society issues an annual publication of Wolfe-related materials, as well as its signature journal, The Thomas Wolfe Review, featuring scholarly articles and features.

Find out more about the Thomas Wolfe Society.

This drawing of Wolfe is one of several issued to periodicals by Charles Scribner's Sons for use in composing advertisements for Wolfe's books. Original is part of the Aldo P. Magi Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

This drawing of Wolfe is one of several issued to periodicals by Charles Scribner’s Sons for use in composing advertisements for Wolfe’s books. Original is part of the Aldo P. Magi Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

To lose yourself in the beauty of language, to be truly moved by the written word, read Thomas Wolfe:
· Look Homeward, Angel (1929)
· Of Time and the River (1935)
· From Death to Morning (1935)
· The Story of a Novel (1936)
· The Web and the Rock (1939)
· You Can’t Go Home Again (1940)
· The Hills Beyond (1941)
· The Letters of Thomas Wolfe (1956)
· The Short Novels of Thomas Wolfe (1961)
· The Letters of Thomas Wolfe to His Mother (1968)
· The Complete Short Stories of Thomas Wolfe (1987)
· The Good Child’s River (1991)
· The Lost Boy (1992)
· The Party at Jack’s (1995)
· O Lost (2000)

Questions about the TWS? Contact the TWS President Terry Roberts: troberts@paideia.org

“Remembering speechlessly, we seek the great forgotten language, the lost lane-end into heaven, a stone, a leaf, an unfound door. . . . O lost, and by the wind grieved, ghost, come back again.”
Look Homeward, Angel